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March 2012 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for March 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Liver Cancer Patients Less Likely to Die on Transplant List

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplantation candidates with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have significantly lower 90-day odds of waitlist removal due to clinical deterioration or death compared to non-HCC candidates with similar Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores, according to a study published in the April issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Room for Improvement in Ob-Gyn Communication About Sex

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- About two-thirds of obstetrician/gynecologists (Ob-Gyns) ask patients about their sexual activities, but other aspects of sexuality, including satisfaction with sex and sexual identity, are not routinely discussed, according to a study published online March 22 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Swimming Improves Vascular Function, BP in Older Adults

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Swimming exercise is associated with a decrease in blood pressure (BP) and improvements in vascular function in older adults with early hypertension, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Lasers Remove Inches From Fat Trouble Spots

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is effective for body slimming, according to a study published in the March issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Maternal and Child Health Inequalities Found Worldwide

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- As part of Countdown to 2015, substantial variation has been identified between countries and interventions with respect to coverage levels of maternal, neonatal, and child health interventions, according to a study published in the March 31 issue of The Lancet.

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Similar Rates of Depression After Stroke and TIA

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- The frequency of depression and newly identified depression rates are similar following a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), according to a study published online March 29 in Stroke.

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Poor Health-Related Function, Diabetes Combo Ups Death Risk

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of type 2 diabetes and impaired health-related functioning (HRF) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, according to a study published online March 23 in Diabetes Care.

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Adherence to Cancer Surveillance Guidelines Varies

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Insured breast cancer survivors have high rates of guideline-recommended recurrence testing and non-recommended metastatic testing, while only about half of colorectal cancer survivors undergo recommended surveillance and two-thirds receive non-recommended metastatic testing, according to a study published online March 20 in Cancer.

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911 Operators May Experience Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency dispatchers experience high levels of peritraumatic distress, which is positively associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a study published online March 29 in the Journal of Traumatic Stress.

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Better Short-Term Outcomes for Private Prostatectomies

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- For men undergoing radical prostatectomies (RPs), private health insurance coverage is linked with fewer complications, less in-hospital recovery time, and decreased mortality, compared to public coverage, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of Cancer.

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CDC: Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders Increasing

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- The estimated prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in 2008 was 11.3 per 1,000 children, which shows a marked increase from earlier estimates, according to a report published March 30 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Stigma Affects Depression Among Lung Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with lung cancer, perceived stigma is significantly associated with depressive symptomatology, according to a study published in the March issue of Psycho-Oncology.

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Statin Discontinuation Linked to Mortality in RA Patients

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at higher risk of death from cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes if they discontinue statin treatment, according to a study published online March 29 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Secondhand Smoke Exposure, Lung Function Link Explored

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand smoke during early childhood is associated with decreased lung function, and allergic sensitization affects this association, particularly among girls, according to a study published online March 21 in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

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High Fruit Consumption Not Linked to Gestational Diabetes

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Higher consumption of whole fruits prior to pregnancy is not associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and the association between fruit juice consumption and GDM appears to be nonlinear, according to a study published online March 23 in Diabetes Care.

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Post-Radical Cystectomy Discharge Patterns Described

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- In the past decade there has been a decrease in prolonged length of stay following radical cystectomy in the United States, while rates of transfer to a facility have remained stable, with insurance status and the surgical institution affecting discharge patterns, according to a study published in the April issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Lifestyle Factors Linked to Slower Progression in MS

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- There is an inverse association between the consumption of alcoholic beverages, coffee, and fish and time to disability progression in people with relapsing onset multiple sclerosis (MS), but not in those with progressive onset MS, according to research published in the April issue of the European Journal of Neurology.

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Prophylaxis With Apixaban Feasible for Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Primary venous thromboembolism prophylaxis with apixaban, an oral direct Factor Xa inhibitor, in ambulatory cancer patients undergoing first- or second-line chemotherapy for advanced or metastatic cancer, is safe and well tolerated, according to a phase II study published online March 12 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Pay for Performance Does Not Improve Mortality Rates

WEDNESDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in the Medicare Premier Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration (Premier HQID) program does not lead to lower 30-day mortality rates, according to a study published online March 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Change in Health Insurance Status Linked to ER Use

WEDNESDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Recent changes in health insurance status are linked to greater emergency department use by newly insured and newly uninsured adults, according to a study published online March 26 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Lifestyle Intervention Helps Overweight Diabetes Patients

WEDNESDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- An intensive lifestyle intervention leads to a significant reduction in the risk of mobility-related disability in overweight type 2 diabetes patients, as compared with diabetes support and education, according to a study published in the March 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Moderate Drinking Cuts Mortality in MI Survivors

WEDNESDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Men who have survived a myocardial infarction (MI) benefit from moderate alcohol consumption, with long-term consumption inversely associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, according to a study published online March 27 in the European Heart Journal.

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Majority of Children Affected by Allergy-Related Diseases

WEDNESDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of children have one or more allergy-related diseases, including eczema, asthma, and rhinitis, according to research published in the April issue of Allergy.

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Cost Sharing Reduces Use of Asthma Medication

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Higher out-of-pocket expenses are tied to a slight reduction in use of asthma medications in children aged 5 years or older, which results in increased hospitalizations, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Chocolate Consumption Tied to Lower Body Mass Index

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- More frequent chocolate intake is linked to a lower body mass index (BMI), according to a research letter published in the March 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Insulin Resistance Increases Risk of Colorectal Adenomas

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin resistance (IR) and central obesity, as measured by waist to hip ratio (WHR), are associated with a significantly increased risk of colorectal adenomas, especially in men, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of Cancer.

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Prolonged Sitting Increases All-Cause Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- People over the age of 45 years who sit for prolonged periods of time each day are at an increased risk of death due to all causes, compared with those who sit for less than four hours/day, according to research published in the March 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Diagnosis of ADHD Has Risen 66 Percent Over Last Decade

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- The diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents has increased 66 percent in the last decade, with approximately one-third of these young patients now being managed by psychiatrists, rather than pediatricians, according to research published in the March issue of Academic Pediatrics.

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Child Coordination Disorder Ups Risk of Mental Health Issues

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Children with probable developmental coordination disorder (DCD) at age 7 have a significantly increased risk of depression and mental health difficulties at age 10, according to a study published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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New Guidelines Issued for Red Blood Cell Transfusions

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- A restrictive red blood cell transfusion strategy should be employed for hemodynamically stable adults and children, according to a clinical practice guideline issued by the AABB (formerly the American Association of Blood Banks) and published online March 26 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Policy Statement Issued on Pediatric Sudden Cardiac Arrest

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians need to recognize the warning signs and appropriately manage patients with sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), according to a policy statement issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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Few Young Women With Cancer Pursue Fertility Preservation

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Few women with cancer diagnosed before age 40 take steps to preserve their fertility during treatment, according to a study published online March 26 in Cancer.

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Confusion About Emergency Contraception Access Common

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- While most pharmacies report having emergency contraception (EC) in stock, misinformation regarding what age women can take it without a prescription is common, according to a study published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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More Variation in SIDS Risk Factors in Back-to-Sleep Era

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Following initiation of the Back-to-Sleep (BTS) campaign in 1994, there have been variations in the risk profile of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a study published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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Long Arm Cast Best for Immobilizing Forearm

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a long arm cast provides the best restriction of forearm rotation, according to a study published in the March 7 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Simple, Realistic Diet and Exercise Guidelines Needed

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Consumers need to be provided with simple, clearly written, realistic, and tailored guidelines for healthy eating, physical activity, and weight-related recommendations, according to research published online March 8 in Obesity Reviews.

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Thigh Fat Area, Muscle Density Linked to RA Indicators

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Thigh fat area and muscle density, but not muscle area, are indicators of disability and physical performance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a study published online March 5 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Aspirin Enhances Platelet Isoprostanes in Type 2 Diabetes

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are treated with aspirin, isoprostanes are overproduced, which is linked with enhanced platelet recruitment, according to a study published online March 16 in Diabetes.

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Living Donor Age Has Little Impact on Kidney Survival

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Living donor age has minimal impact on the survival of a donated kidney, except for those recipients aged 18 to 39 years, according to research published online March 22 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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New Guidelines Issued for Acute Bacterial Rhinosinusitis

THURSDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- As the majority of rhinosinusitis cases are viral, antimicrobial therapy should be initiated after establishment of a clinical diagnosis of bacterial rhinosinusitis, and β-lactam agents are recommended for initial therapy, according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America's first rhinosinusitis guidelines published online March 20 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Health Care Team Members Key for Antimicrobial Stewardship

THURSDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) that use health care epidemiologists (HEs) and infection preventionists (IPs) have a crucial role to play in the effort to combat health care-associated infections (HAIs), including those caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), according to the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America position paper published in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Alternative Medicine Alleviates Symptoms of Rhinosinusitis

THURSDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- An integrative East-West medicine (IEWM) approach in addition to standard medical treatment improves symptoms and quality of life (QOL) for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), according to a pilot study published in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Optimal Prediabetes HbA1c Threshold is 5.7 Percent

THURSDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Lowering the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) cut-off threshold for prediabetes to 5.7 percent is cost-effective even in a high-cost intervention scenario, according to research published online March 13 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Cognitive Decline Seen in Elderly After Hospitalization

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Older people may have an increased risk of memory problems after being discharged from the hospital, according to a study published online March 21 in Neurology.

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Tenecteplase Superior to Alteplase for Stroke Treatment

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Tenecteplase is superior to alteplase for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke for select patients, according to a study published in the March 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Regular Aspirin Use Can Lower Cancer Risk, Studies Confirm

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Regular aspirin use is associated with a lower long-term risk of colorectal and other, particularly gastrointestinal, cancers as well as a reduced risk of distant metastasis, according to research published online March 21 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Dexmedetomidine Non Inferior for Maintaining Sedation

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- The α2-agonist dexmedetomidine is not inferior to the standard sedatives midazolam or propofol in its ability to maintain light-to-moderate sedation during mechanical ventilation, according to research published in the March 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Differences in Interarm BP Linked to Increased Mortality

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hypertension, an interarm difference in systolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg or more or 15 mm Hg or more is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality over 10 years, according to a study published online March 20 in BMJ.

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Weight Gain Linked to Hot Flashes After Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Early-stage breast cancer survivors who gain at least 10 percent of their pre-diagnosis weight are significantly more likely to report hot flashes than those who remain weight stable, according to a study published online March 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Seeing a Human Infant Face Induces Brain Activation

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Viewing an infant face, even an unfamiliar one, is associated with activation of brain regions associated with communication, attachment, and caregiving, according to a study published in the April issue of NeuroImage.

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Tobacco Smoke Exposure in Childhood Ups COPD Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) during childhood is associated with an increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among adult women, and is a significant risk factor for respiratory symptoms in men, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Respirology.

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Anesthesia During Endoscopy, Colonoscopy on the Rise

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Use of gastroenterology anesthesia services increased considerably from 2003 to 2009 among both Medicare and commercially-insured patients, according to a study published in the March 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Vitamin E Does Not Reduce Risk of Heart Failure in Women

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- In a population of healthy women, long-term treatment with vitamin E is not associated with the risk of developing heart failure, according to a study published in the March issue of Circulation: Heart Failure.

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In Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest, Epi Use Linked to Outcomes

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Use of epinephrine for resuscitation in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with increased odds of return of spontaneous circulation, but does not improve patient outcomes, according to a study published in the March 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Nurse-Initiated Steroids Improve Pediatric Asthma Care

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Nurse initiation of oral corticosteroids before physician assessment of pediatric patients with asthma improves quality and efficiency of care provided in the pediatric emergency department, according to a study published online March 19 in Pediatrics.

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Cellphone Radiation In-Utero Linked to Neuropathology

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Mice exposed to cellphone radiation in-utero are more hyperactive and have impaired memory, according to an experimental study published online March 15 in Scientific Reports.

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Carbohydrate-Modified Diets As Effective As Portion-Controlled

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Low carbohydrate (LC) and reduced glycemic load (RGL) diets are as effective as a standard portion-controlled (PC) diet for weight management in children; however, the low-carbohydrate diet is the hardest for children to follow, according to research published online March 1 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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'Mindfulness' Stress Reduction Helps Breast Cancer Survivors

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- A mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program provides significant and lasting improvements in mood, breast- and endocrine-related quality of life, and well-being, according to research published online March 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Characteristics of Episiotomy Incision Influence Injury Risk

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Narrow-angled episiotomies increase the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), while other factors, including point of incision and episiotomy length and depth, reduce the risk of OASIS, according to a study published online March 6 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Majority of Children Overburdened by Backpacks

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of students carry backpacks weighing more than 10 percent of their body weight, and those carrying the heaviest backpacks are at increased risk of back pain, according to a study published online March 10 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Jobs, Earnings Affected for Mothers of Children With Autism

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are more likely to be unemployed, work fewer hours per week, and earn significantly less than mothers of children with no health limitations, according to a study published online March 19 in Pediatrics.

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Study Validates Perimenopausal Memory Complaints

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- For perimenopausal women, memory complaints are associated with working memory and complex attention performance, according to a study published online March 12 in Menopause.

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Moderate Physical Activity Can Improve Fertility in Women

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate physical activity (PA) may improve fertility in all women, regardless of their weight, according to research published online March 16 in Fertility and Sterility.

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Cardiovascular Health Metrics Reduce Total, Cardio Mortality

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Meeting a greater number of the seven cardiovascular health metrics from the American Heart Association is associated with a lower risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, according to a study published online March 16 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prenatal Meth Exposure Linked to Behavioral Problems

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal methamphetamine (MA) exposure is linked to emotional and anxiety problems in 3-year-olds and an increased risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 5-year-olds, according to a study published online March 19 in Pediatrics.

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Synthetic Cannabinoid Toxicity Among Teenagers on the Rise

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking synthetic versions of marijuana is landing some teens in the emergency room complaining of restlessness, agitation, and diaphoresis, according to a case report published online March 19 in Pediatrics.

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Most California Hospitals Implementing Infection Control

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Most California hospitals implement some policies to improve infection control for multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), primarily methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), but few policies are associated with lower MDRO rates, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Study Looks at Effect of Emotions on Pain and Itch Intensity

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Emotions influence the experience of somatosensory sensations of both pain and itch, with negative emotions eliciting higher levels of itch and pain compared to positive emotions, according to research published online March 8 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Bicycle Handlebar Position Affects Female Genital Sensation

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Low handlebar positioning relative to the bicycle saddle is associated with increased perineal saddle pressure and decreased sensation in critical pelvic floor structures, according to research published online March 5 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Communication Can Ease Mental Health Burden of Deaf

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high prevalence of mental health problems among deaf individuals, with access to care compounded by communication difficulties, according to a review published in the March 17 issue of The Lancet.

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Six Months of Breastfeeding Unrealistic for Many Mothers

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- The recommendation to exclusively breastfeed for six months after birth is unrealistic and too rigid for many mothers, representing a clash between idealism and reality, according to a study published online March 14 in BMJ Open.

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Poorer Health Literacy Linked to Increased Mortality

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of older adults in England have medium or low health literacy, which is associated with increased mortality, according to a study published online March 15 in BMJ.

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Less Than Half of Potential Lung Cancer Deaths Averted

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the positive impact of changes in smoking behavior on the number of lung cancer deaths in the United States, many additional cases could potentially have been averted by complete tobacco control, according to research published online March 14 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Fast-Updosed Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Effective

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- An immunologically-enhanced subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) formulation, with an optimized ratio of allergen to adjuvant, induces a significant immunologic response with acceptable safety when injected every three to four days compared with standard weekly injections, according to a study published online March 3 in Allergy.

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Mom's Voice and Heartbeat May Help Premature Babies

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Preliminary evidence suggests that exposing preterm infants, cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), to the sound of their mother's voice and heartbeat may reduce the number of cardiorespiratory events (CREs) they experience, especially in those 33 weeks of gestation and older, according to research published online Feb. 2 in the Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine.

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Analgesic Use After Surgery Linked to Long-Term Use

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients prescribed opioids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain relief after short-stay surgery appear to be at increased risk for becoming long-term analgesic users, according to a study published in the March 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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HIV Burden High Among Female Sex Workers Globally

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among female sex workers in low-income and middle-income countries, the burden of HIV is disproportionately high, compared with other similar-aged women, according to a study published online March 15 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Smoking in Movies Increases Smoking Risk for Young Teens

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to smoking in movies in early adolescence is associated with established smoking among adolescents, according to a review published online March 14 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Prostate Cancer Screening Does Not Reduce All-Cause Mortality

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Screening men for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels significantly reduces their risk of death from prostate cancer, but not their overall risk of death, according to a study in the March 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Most Hospital Errors in Developing Countries Preventable

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 10 percent of patients admitted to a hospital in a developing country experience at least one adverse event, most of which are preventable and are largely due to inadequate training and supervision rather than an absence of resources, according to a study published online March 13 in BMJ.

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Peer-Led Parenting Classes Benefit Parents and Children

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Families participating in peer-led parenting classes experience improvements in children's disruptive behavior problems and parenting practices, according to a study published online March 13 in BMJ.

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Daily Exercise Doesn't Further Improve Glycemic Control

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with type 2 diabetes, 30 minutes of moderate-intensity endurance exercise once a day or an hour every other day are equally effective for controlling hyperglycemia, according to a study published online March 7 in Diabetes Care.

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Higher Spending by Hospitals Improves Outcomes

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that are part of the universal health care system in Canada that spend more on inpatient care have lower rates of deaths and hospital readmissions, according to a study published in the March 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Higher Red Meat Consumption Linked to Risk of Death

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Eating more red meat appears to be associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality and death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer specifically, according to research published online March 12 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Practical Strategies Can Ease Death Notification in the ER

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- By using practical strategies based on available literature, notifying survivors of a death in the emergency department can be less traumatic for both the survivor and the physician, nurse, or other health care provider tasked with delivering the news, according to an article published in the March issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Financial Hardship Common Among Colon Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 40 percent of patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer experience financial hardship, even if they have health insurance coverage, according to research published online March 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Inflammation, Fatigue Tied to Omega-3 Intake After Breast CA

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer survivors there may be an association between inflammation, intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), and fatigue, with increased intake linked to decreased inflammation and fatigue, according to research published online March 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Web-Based Program Helps Manage Cancer-Related Fatigue

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- An Internet-based educational program helps disease-free cancer survivors better manage their cancer-related fatigue (CRF), according to research published online March 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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U.S. Mortality Rates Dropped 60 Percent From 1935 to 2010

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- From 1935 to 2010, the death rate in the United States decreased considerably, although the single-year improvements in mortality were often small, according to a March data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Behavioral Program Successful in High-Risk Obese Population

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- A two-year behavioral intervention program is associated with modest weight loss and improved blood pressure control in a high-risk, socioeconomically disadvantaged group of obese patients, according to research published online March 12 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Sugary Beverages Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- For men, increased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with an increased risk of developing coronary heart disease, while artificially-sweetened beverages do not increase heart disease risk, according to a study published online March 13 in Circulation.

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Youth Agricultural Injuries a Significant Problem

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, more than 26,000 youth agricultural injuries, which tend to be more severe and costly than nonagricultural injuries, occur annually, at a cost of $1.4 billion per year, according to research published online March 12 in Pediatrics.

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Asymptomatic Often Sent for Lung Cancer Screening Tests

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of primary care physicians report ordering lung cancer screening tests for asymptomatic patients, according to research published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Circumcision Reduces Risk of Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Circumcision prior to first sexual intercourse correlates with a reduced risk of prostate cancer (PCa), according to a study published online March 12 in Cancer.

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Aggressive Care Improves QoL in Traumatic Brain Injury

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with routine care, an aggressive-care approach to the treatment of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), which follows the Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines, is estimated to improve quality of life and significantly lower associated costs, regardless of patient age, according to research published online March 6 in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

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Staph Sepsis Increases Mortality in Preterm Infants

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Only about 1 percent of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants develop methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, and the morbidity and mortality are similar to that seen in infants with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infections, according to a study published online March 12 in Pediatrics.

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Stair-Related Injuries in Young Children Declining

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Stair-related injuries among young children have been on the decline for the last decade or so in the United States but are still an important source of injury, according to a study published online March 12 in Pediatrics.

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Parental Psych Well-Being Impacts VLBW Child Behavior

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- For very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, poor parental psychological well-being is associated with behavioral problems at age 3, according to a study published online March 12 in Pediatrics.

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Flu Vaccine Up Among Medical Staff When They Believe It Works

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital health care workers (HCWs) are more likely to receive the seasonal influenza vaccination if they believe it works and are committed to preventing this highly contagious virus, according to research published in the April issue of Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

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Coronary Artery Spasms Rare During Dobutamine Stress Echo

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- The occurrence of coronary artery spasm (CAS) during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) is rare, with a prevalence of 0.4 percent, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Von Willebrand Factor Linked to Bleeding Complications

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Oral anticoagulation (OAC)-treated patients with high levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF) have elevated risks of bleeding complications and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Race and Socioeconomic Status Linked to Chronic Pain

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic pain is worse for black patients and for those living in a neighborhood with low socioeconomic status (SES), according to research published in the February issue of The Journal of Pain.

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Surrogates Tend to Misinterpret Poor Prognosis Information

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Surrogate decision makers for critically ill patients interpret prognostic statements expressing a low risk of death accurately, but interpret statements conveying poor prognosis optimistically, according to a study published in the March 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Elective Induction of Labor Increases Complications

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Induction of labor for non-recognized indications (elective induction of labor) at term is associated with an increased risk of cesarean section delivery and other complications, according to a large cohort study published in the February issue of Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

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Menopausal Symptoms Negatively Affect Work Ability

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Menopausal symptoms negatively affect work ability, according to research published in the March issue of Menopause.

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Misoprostol Cuts Complications in First-Trimester Abortion

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Vaginal administration of misoprostol before first-trimester abortion by vacuum aspiration is associated with reduced complications, according to a study published online March 8 in The Lancet.

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Prenatal SSRI Use Impacts Fetal Head Growth, Preterm Birth

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Untreated maternal depression is linked to reduced fetal head and body growth, while use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy improves symptoms of depression but results in reduced head growth and an increased risk of preterm birth, according to research published online March 5 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Not Recommended

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid substitution therapy with buprenorphine is not recommended for opioid-addicted health care professionals (HCPs), according to research published in the March issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Increased Cognitive Decline One Year After Mild TBI in Children

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) continue to experience postconcussive symptoms that are associated with functional impairment, according to research published online March 5 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Four or More PMDD Symptoms Linked With Impairment

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Women with four or more symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) are likely to experience impairment, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Scottish Smoke-Free Law Cuts Poor Neonatal Outcomes

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of smoke-free legislation in Scotland in 2006 has been associated with a reduction in small for gestational age and preterm delivery, according to a study published online March 6 in PLoS Medicine.

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Eating Fruits and Vegetables Improves Skin Color

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a beneficial effect on skin coloration and perceived attractiveness, according to a study published online March 7 in PLoS One.

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Obesity Not Linked to Mortality in Elderly People Over 85

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity does not increase mortality in elderly adults aged 85 years and older, according to an article published in the Journal of Aging Research.

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For Women, Offspring Number, Parity Linked to Lower MS Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- For women, higher offspring number and higher parity are associated with a reduced risk of first clinical demyelinating event (FCD), according to a study published online March 7 in Neurology.

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Cognitive Benefits With Continued Donepezil in Alzheimer's

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease, continuation of treatment with donepezil is linked to significant cognitive benefits, according to a study published in the March 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Financial Burden of Medical Care Affects One in Three

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- In the first half of 2011, one in three individuals was in a family that experienced the financial burden of medical care in the United States, according to the results of the National Health Interview Survey published March 7 by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Long-Term Cardiac Effects for Childhood Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Regardless of exposure to cardiotoxic cancer therapies, survivors of childhood cancers display cardiovascular abnormalities and have markers of increased systemic inflammation and atherosclerotic disease, according to research published online March 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Smoking Is an Independent Risk Factor for Psoriasis

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking is an independent risk factor for psoriasis, with particularly strong associations for heavy smokers and those who have smoked for many years, according to research published in the March 1 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Double Gloving Prevents Exposure to Pathogens in OR

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Double gloving during surgery reduces the risk for transmission of bloodborne pathogens to medical personnel as well as minimizing the transfer of health care-associated infections to patients, according to a study published in the March issue of the AORN Journal.

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Interrupting Sitting Lowers Glucose, Insulin Levels in Obese

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Interrupting long periods of sitting with light- or moderate-intensity activity is associated with significant reductions in postprandial glucose and insulin levels among overweight and obese individuals, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in Diabetes Care.

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Surgery Helps Reduce Epileptic Seizures When Drugs Fail

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Temporal resection surgery reduces the probability of seizures in patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy, compared with continued antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment, according to a study published in the March 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Software Monitoring System Could Warn of ICD Malfunction

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- A software monitoring program that tracks implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead function could detect problems with the devices earlier than current monitoring processes, according to a study published online March 6 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Veterans With Mental Health Issues Receive More Opioids

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with mental health diagnoses, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), are more likely to receive prescription opioid medications for pain-related conditions, have higher-risk opioid use patterns, and have increased adverse clinical outcomes associated with opioid use, compared to veterans with no mental health diagnoses, according to a study published in the March 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dutasteride Doesn't Alter Anabolic Effects of Testosterone

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Men receiving testosterone supplementation who also receive dutasteride, which blocks the conversion of testosterone to its potent metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), do not experience a significant difference in changes in muscle-related measures or sexual function compared to men receiving testosterone without dutasteride, according to a study published in the March 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Pten Gene Linked to Longevity and Weight in Mice

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Mice carrying extra copies of an anti-cancer gene, Pten, live longer, are protected from cancer, and have hyperactive brown fat, according to an experimental study published in the March 7 issue of Cell Metabolism.

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Positive Whole-Body CT Can Detect but Not Eliminate Trauma

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- For assessing severe trauma, single-pass whole-body computed tomography (CT), or pan-scanning, can detect, but not definitively exclude, the presence of injuries, according to a study published online March 5 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Regimen Shows Benefit for Advanced Melanoma

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- A minimal, less-toxic conditioning treatment with cyclophosphamide, that allows cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clones to survive for longer, shows some clinical benefit in patients with refractory, metastatic melanoma, according to a study published online March 5 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Depression, Cognitive Decline Linked in Elderly With CAD

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients with coronary artery disease who have persistent depression have a significantly increased risk of cognitive decline, according to a study published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Gastroesophageal Reflux Linked to Tooth Surface Loss

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Tooth surface loss is significantly greater in individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) than in controls, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

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Vitamin D May Reduces Stress Fractures in Adolescent Girls

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- High intake of vitamin D is associated with a reduced risk of stress fractures in adolescent girls, particularly for those who engage in high-impact activity, according to a study published online March 5 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Negative Prediction for Sudden Cardiac Death High With ECG

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Electrocardiogram (ECG), with or without echocardiogram (ECHO), may have potential value as a mass screening tool to identify the most common causes of pediatric sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to a meta-analysis published online March 5 in Pediatrics.

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Electronic Test Result Access Does Not Reduce Test Ordering

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- For office-based physicians, electronic access to patient imaging and laboratory test results does not decrease -- and may actually increase -- the number of diagnostic tests ordered, according to research published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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Simplified Delivery Has Little Effect on Bleeding Risk

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Omitting controlled cord traction, a procedure to extract the placenta that requires a skilled birth attendant, after delivery has little effect on the risk of excessive postpartum bleeding when oxytocin is administered immediately after birth, according to a study published online March 6 in The Lancet.

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Genetic, Environmental Factors Affect Drug Abuse in Adopted

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Drug abuse in an adoptive home environment is a complex syndrome influenced by a range of genetic and environmental risk factors, according to the results of a large-scale Swedish study published online March 5 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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AHA Supports Shared Decision Making in Heart Failure

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Shared decision making in advanced heart failure has become more challenging and more important, with increased disease duration and available treatment options, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) published online March 5 in Circulation.

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Youngest in Class More Likely to Be Diagnosed With ADHD

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- The youngest children in a classroom are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and prescribed medication than their older peers in the same grade, according to a study published online March 5 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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ACP Issues Guidance on Colorectal Cancer Screening

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Screening of average-risk individuals for colorectal cancer (CRC) should begin at age 50 with a stool-based test, flexible sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy, according to a guidance statement from the American College of Physicians (ACP) published in the March 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Viewing Alcohol Use in Movies Tied to Teen Binge Drinking

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent exposure to movies that depict alcohol consumption is significantly associated with binge drinking, according to a multi-national study published online March 5 in Pediatrics.

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Barriers Identified to Pediatric Advance Care Discussions

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Prognostic understanding and parental attitude are significant barriers to advance care discussions (ACD) for children with life-threatening conditions, according to a study published online March 5 in Pediatrics.

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Children's Snoring May Predict Behavioral Problems

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children during the first years of life appears to be strongly associated with future behavioral problems, according to a study published online March 5 in Pediatrics.

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Prenatal Ecstasy Use May Harm Infant Development

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), or ecstasy, before and during pregnancy poses a risk to the developing infant, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in Neurotoxicology and Teratology.

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Ultrasound IDs Post-Transplant Recurrent Hep C Cirrhosis

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound-based transient elastography (TE) provides diagnostic accuracy for detecting cirrhosis due to recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection following liver transplantation, according to a meta-analysis published in the March issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Patient Preferences a Factor in Premature Birth Options

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Obstetric decisions in managing and counseling for periviable deliveries are heavily influenced by patient preference and perspectives on patient autonomy, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Retinol Supplementation May Lower Melanoma Risk

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Retinol supplementation is associated with a lower risk of melanoma, according to research published online March 1 in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

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Drug Relieves Opioid-Induced Constipation in Critically Ill

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- For critically ill patients with opioid-induced constipation, treatment with methylnaltrexone (MNTX) is associated with improved bowel function compared with standard rescue therapy, according to a study published in the March issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Fecal Transplant Feasible for Recurrent C. difficile Infection

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) can successfully be treated in the vast majority of patients through a fecal transplantation procedure via colonoscopy, according to research published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

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Home Lead Inspections Linked to Lower Lead in Children

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- A program that inspects the homes of high-risk pregnant women for lead and remediates them is effective in reducing lead levels and lead poisoning in their children, according to a study in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Enhancing Cardiac FAK Reduces Ischemia/Reperfusion Damage

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Mice that overproduce focal adhesion kinase (FAK) experience less ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis, according to a study published online March 1 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Diabetic Polyneuropathy Not Up With Impaired Glycemia

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although significantly increased in subjects with new diabetes, the rates of typical diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), retinopathy, and nephropathy are not significantly different between subjects with and without impaired glycemia (IG), according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

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PISQ-12 Validated for Patients With Pelvic Organ Prolapse

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- The Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12) has been shown to be a valid measure of sexual function in patients who undergo surgical mesh implantation for treatment of pelvic organ prolapse, according to research published online Feb. 21 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Cardiovascular Event Risk Not Up for Living Kidney Donors

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- For living kidney donors, there is no increase in the risk of major cardiovascular events or death in the first decade following donation, compared with a representative sample of the healthiest segment of the general population, according to a study published online March 1 in BMJ.

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Risk of Poor Neonatal Outcome Up With Decreasing Gestation

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- The health outcomes of infants born moderate/late preterm or early term are worse than those born full term, with a gradient of increasing risk with decreasing gestation, according to a study published online March 1 in BMJ.

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Parent Training, Meds Combo Improves Behavior in PDD

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) and serious behavioral problems respond better to medication combined with parent training than just medication, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Pap Smears Increase Cervical Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose cervical cancers are detected by cervical smears are much more likely to survive than women whose cancers are symptomatic, according to a study published online March 1 in BMJ.

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Increasing Shift From Islet Antibody Positivity to Diabetes

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- There is an increase in both the prevalence and levels of islet antigen-2 and zinc transporter 8, as well as in autoantibodies, in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients during a period of rising disease incidence, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes.

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Gestational Diabetes, Obesity Impact Pregnancy Outcomes

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who are obese have significantly higher odds of adverse pregnancy outcomes, according to findings from the multinational Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study published online Feb. 22 in Diabetes Care.

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Complementary Meds Used by 17 Percent of Elderly With Cancer

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of older people with cancer using complementary medications as they start a chemotherapy regimen is 17 percent, and is associated with less advanced disease and higher functional status, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in Cancer.

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Bariatric Surgery Risks Up in Patients With Kidney Disease

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Higher rates of bariatric surgery complications are seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), with advancing disease stage correlating with increasing complication rates, according to research published online March 1 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Biomarkers Gauge Kidney Injury After Heart Surgery

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Measuring biomarkers found in blood and urine after heart surgery can help predict which patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) will experience AKI progression, according to a study published online March 1 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Trans Fat Intake Tied to Stroke in Postmenopausal Women

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Higher trans fat intake increases the risk of ischemic stroke independent of other lifestyle factors, but the adverse effects of trans fat on ischemic stroke may be mitigated by aspirin, according to a study published online March 1 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Risk of Stroke Increases With Each Year of Having Diabetes

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of stroke increases with the length of time a patient has diabetes, according to a study published online March 1 in Stroke.

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Sleep Quality Found to Actually Improve With Age

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to popular belief, sleep quality, as measured by sleep disturbances and daytime fatigue, actually improves with age, according to a study published in the March issue of SLEEP.

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Epigenetic Blockade May Impair Cognition in Alzheimer's

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- An epigenetic blockade may be responsible for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease, and reversing this blockade improves cognitive abilities in mouse models of Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration, according to an experimental study published online Feb. 29 in Nature.

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Phone Counseling Doesn't Up Osteoporosis Meds Adherence

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a telephone-based motivational interviewing intervention does not improve adherence to an osteoporosis medication regimen, according to research published online Feb. 27 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Vandetanib Doesn't Up Survival in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Vandetanib does not improve overall survival for patients who have received previous treatment for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Secondhand Smoke Shortens Transplant Survival in Mice

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- The immunologic mechanisms behind smoke-related graft rejection have been elucidated, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Incidence, Risk Factors ID'd for Proximal Junctional Kyphosis

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Pre-existing and perioperative factors may trigger proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) in about 22 percent of patients with adult idiopathic scoliosis who undergo long instrumented spinal fusion surgery, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in Spine.

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Hypoferremia Predicts Treatment Response to IFN-α

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepcidin, a regulator of iron homeostasis, is induced following a single dose of pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFNα), and may be a surrogate marker of immediate efficacy of IFN-α, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in Hepatology.

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Phobias Can Magnify Perception of the Feared Object

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Fear affects how perceptual information is processed and magnifies phobic stimuli, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Anxiety Disorders.

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No Benefit for Stent Versus Medical Therapy in Stable CAD

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- A meta-analysis of more than 7,000 patients suggests that there is no benefit to initial stent implantation over medical therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD), according to research published in the Feb. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Thalidomide Induces Complete Response in Cutaneous Lupus

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose thalidomide successfully induces complete response in a majority of patients with refractory cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), according to research published in the March issue of the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Internet-Based Program Treats Chronic Fatigue in Teens

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Use of an Internet-based therapeutic program, Fatigue In Teenagers on the interNET (FITNET), improves outcomes for adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome, according to a study published online March 1 in The Lancet.

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Reduced Lung Function Linked to Heart Failure Risk

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Lung function and obstructive airway diseases are strongly and independently associated with an increased risk of heart failure, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in the European Journal of Heart Failure.

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