Posts in "risk-factors/"

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10 common lung cancer questions with Dr. Jack Wei

Written by Community Health Network on 8/4/2014 6:30:00 AM

Dr. Jack WeiWe sat down with radiation oncologist and certified MD Anderson Cancer Network® physician, Dr. Jack Wei, to discuss questions surrounding the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. 

  1. Is there a link between lung cancer and smoking?
  2. Yes, smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer. There can be other factors, but this is the number one cause.
     
  3. Are smokers at the highest risk for lung cancer?
  4. Yes, current smokers are the highest risk. Former smokers who’ve quit within the past 15 years, are between 55-80 years of age and have a 30 pack-year history of smoking are at a very high risk, too.
     
  5. Are people who have quit smoking still at risk for lung cancer?
  6. Yes, quitters are still at risk. Their risk is lowered when they stop smoking for an extended period of time, but it’s still recommended they get a lung screening to determine the health of their lungs. continue reading ...


Cancer answers: What is prostate cancer?

Written by Community Health Network on 6/7/2014 6:00:00 AM

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in menProstate cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum.

It is about the size of a walnut and surrounds the urethra (the tube that empties urine from the bladder). The prostate gland produces fluid that makes up part of the semen.

Who gets prostate cancer?
About one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. It is very rare in men younger than 40, but the chance of having prostate cancer rises rapidly after age 50. About 6 in 10 cases of prostate cancer are found in men over the age of 65.

It is most common in African American men, though the reason for this is unknown. continue reading ...


Lung cancer bigger killer than breast cancer

Written by Community Health Network on 5/14/2014 11:00:00 AM

On Tuesday, The American Lung Association, in partnership with CVS Caremark unveiled LUNG FORCE, a new initiative to make lung cancer in women a public health priority, drive policy change and increase research funding.

U.S. women still see breast cancer as a bigger killer than lung cancer, despite it being the number one cancer killer of men and women. More than 108,000 women in the will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year in the U.S. and, on average, less than half will be alive next year. Not to mention, lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in the State of Indiana. continue reading ...


Seven easy ways to prevent colon cancer

Written by Community Health Network on 3/13/2014 7:00:00 AM

Cancer and nutrition experts say that more than 50 percent of colorectal cancers are preventable by combining a diet that includes fiber with daily physical activity and weight management. Try these easy diet and nutrition tips to protect yourself against colon cancer.

Eat fiber to help prevent colon cancerEat more fiber.
Just 10 grams of fiber a day can reduce your risk for colorectal cancer by 10 percent. You'll find fiber in whole grain breads, cereals, oatmeal and beans.

Eating fruits and veggies can help prevent colorectal cancerPile on the produce.
Add more fruits and vegetables to your diet. Try deep green/cruciferous veggies and red and orange fruits. continue reading ...

Tags: diet , fiber , red meat , risk factors , smoking | Posted in: Colon Cancer

Dr. Joseph Henderson shares colorectal cancer risk factors

Written by Community Health Network on 3/6/2014 7:00:00 AM

Researchers have found several risk factors that may increase a person's chance of developing colorectal polyps or colorectal cancer.

Age
Younger adults can develop colorectal cancer, but the chances increase greatly after age 50. About 9 out of 10 people diagnosed with colorectal cancer are at least 50 years old.

Family history
As many as 1 in 5 people who develop colon cancer have other family members who have had it. People with a history of colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, or children) are at increased risk. It is even higher if that relative was diagnosed with cancer when they were younger than 45, or if more than one first-degree relative is affected. continue reading ...


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