Viewing 1-4 of 4 result(s).

Scott Hamilton took down testicular cancer

Written by Community Health Network on 4/3/2014 8:00:00 AM

Scott Hamilton, Olympic Gold Medalist and figure skating commentator didn’t skate through life.

Due to a rare disease Hamilton developed as a young boy, his growth was stunted. It was ice skating that helped him become physically stronger. Determined to be good at the sport, he practiced and worked his way up through the junior championships.

Hamilton sped forward and was the flag bearer at the 1980 Olympics, winner at the 1981 World Figure Skating Championships and gold medalist at the Winter Olympics in Sarajevo in a 1984.

After his Olympic win, Hamilton became a part of many touring ice skating shows, including Stars On Ice. On March 18, 1997, during one of the tours, Scott Hamilton learned that he had testicular cancer. continue reading ...


Olympic figure skating great Dorothy Hamill recalls chemotherapy side effects

Written by Community Health Network on 2/15/2014 10:15:00 AM

In 1976, Dorothy Hamill trademarked the "Hamill-Camel", a figure skating spin, and won gold at the Winter Olympics in Innsbruck. Instead of retiring from the sport when she was at the top of the podium, she went on to compete in the next year’s World Figure Skating Championship—and won. Dorothy applied those same guts when she was diagnosed with cancer.

In 2007, the figure skating champion was diagnosed with breast cancer. After extensive chemotherapy and treatment she was declared cancer-free in 2009. But even a few years after her last chemotherapy session, Hamill still felt drained from all of the treatment.

“I don’t have a lot of energy,” said Hamill in a 2010 interview with People magazine. “I get really tired. Even when I’m not skating I get tired.”

Christina Kim, M.D., an MD Anderson Cancer Network™ certified physician at Community Health Network, specializes in breast surgery. She says there are common long-term side effects from chemotherapy. continue reading ...


Peggy Fleming, breast cancer survivor and former Olympian, shares lessons learned

Written by Community Health Network on 2/5/2014 1:15:00 PM

Figure skating was not always a part of the Winter Olympics. The first figure skating events were performed at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London. It wasn't until 1976 that they were added to the winter lineup. From that time on we've watched the speed, agility and gracefulness of skaters like Peggy Fleming.

At nine years old, Peggy had her first experience skating and felt an immediate thrill and comfort on the ice. She had some hard knocks as she began competing, but decided that she liked winning more.

Picking herself up and getting back on the ice, she developed the confidence and perseverance to win first place at the 1964 U.S. Figure Skating Championships at the age of 15. In her first Olympics (1964 Innsbruck, Austria) she placed sixth. In 1966 she won her first World Championship. By the 1968 Olympics, Peggy had learned to rely on muscle memory and focus under extraordinary pressure. That year she took home gold. (Peggy is clad in green in the picture below.)

Thirty years later, in 1998, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Now 66 and cancer-free, Peggy speaks publicly about her battle with cancer and 15-year journey as a survivor. At a Pink Ribbon Symposium in 2012, Peggy shared her story, which was reported in the Florida-Union Times.

Peggy noticed a lump on her breast in 1998, initially dismissing it as a pulled muscle. A month later when it had not gone away, she made a doctor’s appointment. Initially, due to the small size of the lump, the cancer specialist couldn’t find it. It wasn’t until Peggy pointed it out that they saw it. A biopsy confirmed that it was a malignant cancer tumor. continue reading ...


Make your losses your wins

Written by Community Health Network on 2/2/2014 7:00:00 AM

Scott Hamilton, the 1992 winter figure skating Olympian and testicular cancer survivor since 1997, didn’t skate through life. At a 2012 Voice of Hope cancer summit in Missouri he recalled having a roller coaster life -- success often followed by heartbreak.

Scott Hamilton, Olympic figure skater, has battled cancer

As a boy, Scott was small for his age and did not grow like other teen boys. During this time, he started ice skating and became physically stronger. Determined to be good at the sport, he practiced and worked his way up through the junior championships. Then, during his senior year in high school, his mom was diagnosed with breast cancer. And a year after her diagnosis she passed away.

"She always found the positive in everything,” he said at the 2012 Voices of Hope cancer summit. “Something good, something horrible,” Hamilton said. “That was my pattern.” But Scott did not let that defeat him. Learning from his mom, he resolved “to never be less than my mother expected me to be.” continue reading ...


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