Posts in "cancer-caregivers/"

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Early detection saved her life

Written by Community Health Network on 8/12/2014 6:00:00 AM


Chances for survival vary by stage of breast cancer. Non-invasive (stage 0) and early stage invasive breast cancers (stages I and II) have a better prognosis than later stage cancers (stage III and IV). And, cancer that has not spread beyond the breast has a better prognosis than cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes.

Catching cancer at its earliest stage only increases a patient's chances for survival. Courtney Larson, a Community Cancer Care patient, knows a thing or two about the importance of early detection of breast cancer: It saved her life.

Larson was performing a breast self-exam when she discovered a suspicious lump. Concerned, she followed up with her physician. A diagnostic mammogram was performed and revealed Larson had breast cancer.

After surgery to remove her cancerous tumor, six rounds of chemotherapy and thirty rounds of radiation treatment, Larson was declared cancer-free. But her passion to keep fighting cancer did not end there. continue reading ...


Taking cancer care in a whole new direction

Written by Community Health Network on 4/16/2014 3:30:00 PM

Community Cancer Center South will open to the public tomorrow! Located on the Community Hospital South campus this facility is approaching cancer care in new ways.

At our new cancer center we have combined a multidisciplinary team of medical experts with state-of-the-art technology in a healing environment – all under one roof. Our coordinated approach to care enables patients to see all their care providers at one place, saving time and reducing the need for multiple appointments. Patients are supported by a team that includes an oncology social worker, oncology dietitian, financial counselors and dedicated patient navigators.

Executive Director at Community Cancer Center South, Regina Ward, and Community Health Network CEO, Bryan Mills, talk about the unique approach our facility takes to cancer care.


Visit our website for more information about Community Cancer Center South.


Cancer answers: Am I at high risk for breast cancer?

Written by Community Health Network on 2/13/2014 1:15:00 PM

Many breast cancers are detected by mammograms before any symptoms appear and can help women who are diagnosed early increase their risk of survival. So, our physicians recommend asking yourself five questions to start to determine your cancer risk and get to know symptoms of breast cancer.

  1. Do you have a history of radiation treatment to the chest for any medical condition? 
  2. Do you have a genetic mutation linked to breast cancer? Gene abnormalities include BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, or the syndromes Li-Fraumeni, CDH1, Cowden’s, or Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba. 
  3. Do you have a history of lobular neoplasia (LCIS) or atypical ductal Hyperplasia (ADH)? Also, called LCIS, this condition is not considered breast cancer, but a risk factor. LCIS is an area of abnormal cell growth in the lobules (the milk-producing glands at the end of breast ducts) that begins in the breast tissue and remains in the lobule and does not spread. 
  4. Do you have a family history of breast cancer? And if so, were these women diagnosed before the age of 50? 
  5. Know your reproduction and menstrual history. Did you begin your period before the age of 12, start menopause after the age of 55, have your first-full term pregnancy after the age of 30, or never had a full-term pregnancy or are obese after menopause? 
There are other risk factors including regular alcohol consumption, long-term use of supplemental estrogen and progestin menopausal hormone therapies. Postmenopausal women who are obese but have not used hormone therapy are also at high risk.

But, the key for all women is to know what normal breast tissue feels and looks like. Perform self-examinations and have routine physicals. Talk to your family to better understand if there is a history of breast cancer or any cancer in your family. Lastly, talk to your physician. 

If you feel you are at risk, don’t delay. Community Breast Care can arrange appointments within 24-hours. Call 800.777.7775.


Cancer caregivers: A beacon of hope

Written by Community Health Network on 2/3/2014 9:30:00 AM

Behind every Olympian there is a team of trainers helping him or her prepare for competition. Cancer patients also have a team behind them. Cancer caregivers are just like Olympic trainers and coaches – they’re willing to go the distance for the person battling cancer and act as a beacon of hope. Having a support team is critical to a cancer patient’s recovery.

Author and cancer survivor, Lori Hope, talks about how important and helpful it is to have a caregiver in her book, Help Me Live: 20 Things People With Cancer Want You To Know. “We want nothing more than to offer comfort and support, and foster hope. But we don’t always know how—and may feel uncomfortable asking,” said Hope.

Following her own treatment for cancer, Hope asked cancer survivors about issues surrounding their cancer journey that they wanted their families, friends and caregivers to understand. Here are five of the things that she discovered and encourages cancer caregivers to be mindful of. continue reading ...


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Appointments available!

To make an appointment with an MD Anderson Cancer Network® certified physician at Community, call 800-777-7775 today!



October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Screening mammograms help detect cancer early and determine cancer risk. Ladies, schedule yours here.


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