Posts in "md-anderson-cancer-network/"

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Scientists find bladder cancer similar to breast cancer

Written by Community Health Network on 2/20/2014 8:30:00 PM

Using genetic testing, scientists at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center® identified a resemblance between muscle invasive bladder cancer and three of the four sub-types of breast cancer (published in Cancer Cell February 2014). They found that the bladder cancer genes look very similar to some breast cancers.

“Several of our findings have immediate potential impact on how we address muscle-invasive bladder cancer with chemotherapy,” said study senior author David McConkey, Ph.D., professor of Urology. “These dormant (bladder) cells evade chemotherapy, which preferentially kills dividing cells.” continue reading ...


The story behind the lapel pin

Written by Community Health Network on 2/11/2014 9:00:00 PM

Twenty Community Health Network cancer care physicians are proudly wearing a new lapel pin. The pin signifies their certification by MD Anderson Cancer Network™ – one of America’s leading cancer care providers.

The pin means that the physician has met MD Anderson's nationally recognized standards in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and uses MD Anderson’s guidelines and treatment plans with their patients.

But the pin represents more than a certification; it is a beacon of hope. It means that Community Hospitals North and East have an affiliation with the MD Anderson network.

“MD Anderson Cancer Center believes patients should be treated in their own community,” said Myra Fouts, vice president of oncology services at Community Health Network. “This philosophy raises the standards of care within the community and certifies local cancer doctors are meeting the same standard of care. The MD Anderson standards are demanding. What this means for the patient is each person is receiving the very same treatment for a standard type of therapy.” continue reading ...


Radiation therapy: Zeroing in on cancer

Written by Community Health Network on 2/8/2014 10:30:00 AM

This is the first blog in a three-part interview series with Dr. Chandrika Patel, radiation oncologist. She is board certified in radiation oncology by the American Board of Radiology and a certified MD Anderson Cancer Network® physician at Community Cancer Center East.

What is radiation therapy?

Radiation therapy is treatment where beams of high-energy rays are used to target and destroy cancer cells. Radiation oncologists specialize in treating cancer patients with it. Radiation therapy is not like chemotherapy. Radiation treats just the tumor. Chemo uses drugs to treat the whole body.

Because of the precision and versatility with which these treatments are delivered, over 66 percent of cancer patients will have some form of radiotherapy as part of their treatment. It may be given at different times in cancer treatment, dependent upon the cancer type. Sometimes it is used to shrink a tumor, or used after a surgery to kill areas the surgery missed.

Are there different types of radiation therapy?
Depending on the type of cancer you have, you may be treated with high-dose rate (HDR) radiotherapy. This treatment uses higher amounts of radiation than in typical radiation therapy. The radiation is directed precisely at the tumor to avoid damaging healthy tissue, with the advantage that it may kill more cancer cells in fewer treatments.

In contrast, low dose rate radiation brachytherapy, is a different way to deliver radiation. Low dose radiation is commonly used for prostate cancer treatments, and involves implanting a radioactive “seed” in the body permanently to damage the cancer cells. This allows application of a higher dose of radiation for a shorter period of time to a small area. continue reading ...


Music and cancer: The connection

Written by Community Health Network on 2/4/2014 7:30:00 PM

Singer-songwriter Mallary Hope wrote the song “My Day” in 2009, on a day when she was disheartened by her lackluster music career. At the time, she envisioned the song as part of music video for Relay for Life, Avon Breast Cancer Walkers or Special Olympics. Fast-forward to 2013, and the song is actually a part of the Sochi Olympics. “My Day” was chosen to be a part of NBC’s 2014 Winter Olympic advertising campaign. Singing the song now is Danielle Bradbery, teen country singer and season four winner of “The Voice.”

Whether you are fighting cancer or fighting for a place on the U.S. Olympic team, this anthem is filled with adrenaline and courage. And it’s this feeling of emotion when listening to a song that is said to help cancer patients. continue reading ...


Cancer caregivers: A beacon of hope

Written by Community Health Network on 2/3/2014 9:30:00 AM

Behind every Olympian there is a team of trainers helping him or her prepare for competition. Cancer patients also have a team behind them. Cancer caregivers are just like Olympic trainers and coaches – they’re willing to go the distance for the person battling cancer and act as a beacon of hope. Having a support team is critical to a cancer patient’s recovery.

Author and cancer survivor, Lori Hope, talks about how important and helpful it is to have a caregiver in her book, Help Me Live: 20 Things People With Cancer Want You To Know. “We want nothing more than to offer comfort and support, and foster hope. But we don’t always know how—and may feel uncomfortable asking,” said Hope.

Following her own treatment for cancer, Hope asked cancer survivors about issues surrounding their cancer journey that they wanted their families, friends and caregivers to understand. Here are five of the things that she discovered and encourages cancer caregivers to be mindful of. continue reading ...


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