Posts in "lung-cancer/"

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10 common lung cancer questions with Dr. Jack Wei

Written by Community Health Network on 8/4/2014 6:30:00 AM

Dr. Jack WeiWe sat down with radiation oncologist and certified MD Anderson Cancer Network® physician, Dr. Jack Wei, to discuss questions surrounding the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. 

  1. Is there a link between lung cancer and smoking?
  2. Yes, smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer. There can be other factors, but this is the number one cause.
     
  3. Are smokers at the highest risk for lung cancer?
  4. Yes, current smokers are the highest risk. Former smokers who’ve quit within the past 15 years, are between 55-80 years of age and have a 30 pack-year history of smoking are at a very high risk, too.
     
  5. Are people who have quit smoking still at risk for lung cancer?
  6. Yes, quitters are still at risk. Their risk is lowered when they stop smoking for an extended period of time, but it’s still recommended they get a lung screening to determine the health of their lungs. continue reading ...


Lung cancer bigger killer than breast cancer

Written by Community Health Network on 5/14/2014 11:00:00 AM

On Tuesday, The American Lung Association, in partnership with CVS Caremark unveiled LUNG FORCE, a new initiative to make lung cancer in women a public health priority, drive policy change and increase research funding.

U.S. women still see breast cancer as a bigger killer than lung cancer, despite it being the number one cancer killer of men and women. More than 108,000 women in the will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year in the U.S. and, on average, less than half will be alive next year. Not to mention, lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in the State of Indiana. continue reading ...


How a low-dose CT scan finds lung cancer, featuring Dr. Jack Wei

Written by Community Health Network on 2/26/2014 8:00:00 AM

Computed tomography (a.k.a. CT scan) is not new technology, but low-dose CT scans for lung screening are part of a new national recommendation for long-term smokers and even those who stopped smoking 15 years ago. A low-dose computed tomography (CT) lung screening machine looks like a giant donut that you pass through. But within a few minutes the lung scan is over. No needles or punctures, and the open concept really shouldn't be a problem for anyone who is claustrophobic.

So, why get a low dose CT? continue reading ...


Cancer answers: Is a CT scan for me?

Written by Community Health Network on 2/19/2014 2:00:00 PM

The new guidelines for lung cancer screenings encourage those at risk to get a low-dose CT scan. Who's at risk and why do they need a low-dose CT scan? We asked diagnostic radiologist, Kenyon Kopecky, M.D., FACR, at Irvington Radiology, to weigh in.

Chest x-ray vs lung CT scan

Who is really at risk for lung cancer?
Smokers are at the highest level of risk. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual screening for lung cancer for adults ages 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history (one pack per day for 30 years or two packs per day for 15 years) and currently smoke, OR adults in the same age range who have quit within the past 15 years.

For a smoker who is otherwise healthy, scheduling a lung screening may not seem urgent or even necessary. In fact, the idea of screening individuals at “high risk” has been debated for decades. But, simply put, smoking is the biggest risk factor in all cancer types. Smoking causes 90 percent of all lung cancer cases. continue reading ...


Top Hoosier cancers

Written by Community Health Network on 2/18/2014 6:00:00 AM

Schedule a lung screening.
If you're a current or past smoker, call at 800-777-7775 or visit us online to schedule a $99 lung screening.


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