Posts in "blood-cancer/"

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Hockey great keeps Hodgkin’s lymphoma in check

Written by Community Health Network on 2/21/2014 10:30:00 AM

For his performance during the 1992-1993 season with the Pittsburg Penguins, back-to-back Stanley Cup Championships and gold medal win in the 2002 Olympic Games in Salt Lake, Mario Lemieux earned the name “Super Mario”. But what is truly super about this hockey legend is that he is a cancer survivor.

In 1993 Mario was having the season of his career and was close to establishing a new National Hockey League (NHL) scoring record. Then, he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s disease, now known as Hodgkin’s lymphomacontinue reading ...


Cancer survivor and Olympian goes for gold

Written by Community Health Network on 2/12/2014 9:00:00 PM

Very few of the Olympians competing in Sochi can say they are cancer survivors. Nordic combined skier Bryan Fletcher is one of those few. Fletcher had acute lymphoblastic leukemia as a child.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the blood, and the most common form of childhood cancer. Symptoms of ALL include fever, tiredness, bone or joint pain, enlarged lymph nodes and unusual bruising. 

To diagnosis this type of leukemia doctors must perform a blood test to look at the blood cells and bone marrow for abnormalities. A spinal tap may be needed to see if ALL is in the central nervous system of the body. It is a fast-growing cancer of lymphocyte-forming cells called lymphoblasts. When diagnosed it can be treated with medicines and treatments like chemotherapy. 

"As a kid going through chemo, it's something that you always remember and are always going to look back on," said Fletcher in a December interview. "But going through it, I always just wanted to be a normal kid." continue reading ...


NBC news correspondent diagnosed with cancer

Written by Community Health Network on 2/12/2014 7:30:00 AM

In the wake of 2014 Olympic coverage, Tom Brokaw announced that he has multiple myeloma.

The NBC News Special Correspondent released a personal statement stating that he has been diagnosed with cancer of the blood, but that his physicians are very encouraged with the progress he is making.

Multiple myeloma is a cancer that affects plasma cells in bone marrow. When plasma cells become cancerous and grow, they can produce a tumor called a plasmacytoma. These tumors usually develop in the bone. When there is more than one plasma cell tumor, it is called multiple myeloma. continue reading ...


Team USA hockey player, cancer supporter

Written by Community Health Network on 2/10/2014 7:00:00 AM

Kevin Shattenkirk of the St. Louis Blues can be seen skating with Team USA in Sochi. But this hockey player is more than a puck-stopping defenseman, he is also a cancer supporter.

Shattenkirk recently learned that his former coach of the Devils Youth Hockey Club, Chad Dlugolecki, was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia on January 2. Since learning of the diagnosis he's joined Dlugolecki's support team. He's even shown support of a website created to raise money to help fund the coach's hospital bills and treatment.

"Chad, he had me when I was right around 12-13 all the way up until I was about 16," Shattenkirk told St. Louis' Foxsports.com. "Just a great, great coach. Good motivator. Very passionate about the game and someone that always made the game fun when we were younger and I think that's a very important quality to have as a coach." continue reading ...


The basics of blood cancer

Written by Community Health Network on 2/9/2014 9:15:00 PM

Blood cancer specialist, Dr. Sumeet BhatiaSumeet Bhatia, M.D., is a board certified medical oncologist, hematologist and internal medicine specialist. Dr. Bhatia is also a certified MD Anderson Cancer Network® physician.

Every four minutes in America someone is diagnosed with a blood cancer. These types of cancers include leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma, as well as many other rare blood and bone marrow disorders. As a medical oncologist treating these cancers, Dr. Bhatia says he feels very optimistic when treating these types of cancer. Dr. Bhatia helps break down the types and gives us the basics on blood cancer.

Is there a typical age that someone gets cancer of the blood?

These cancers do not respect age. Cancers of the blood affect the youngest and the oldest of people, and many in between. Last year in Indiana, 2,910 cases of lymphoma, leukemia or myeloma were diagnosed and 1,220 people died. A quarter of those cases were diagnosed in children and teens. Leukemia remains the most common type of childhood cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the third most common type of cancer among children.

What are the most common blood cancer types?

Leukemia can come on suddenly and makes the individual very sick very fast. Older patients with leukemia often experience back pain that doesn’t subside, fatigue and bleeding. Chronic leukemia may even be detected accidentally when the person has fever and enlarged spleen or swollen stomach.

Both Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma are characterized by nights sweats. These patients may not initially present with any other symptoms, but lab tests are used to help make a diagnosis. 

Myeloma is most often diagnosed in adults over 60 years old. This cancer can be a very slow growing cancer. There have been many medical advances in the treatment of myeloma since the 1990s. At that time, the survival prognosis was just 18 months. Now, individuals with myeloma have a much longer survival rate: 12 or more years. continue reading ...


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